August 13, 2022
Alongside the locally assembled A 35 and GLA 35, Mercedes-Benz Malaysia have also launched the newest, most hardcore AMG GT coupe into the Malaysian market: the Black Series. If the bright orange and gloss black accents didn’t hint at its performance credentials, or if over-the-top aero bits weren’t convincing enough that this machine sits at the top tier of AMG road machines, know that in 2020 it snatched the title of fastest production car to lap the Nurburgring Nordschleife: 6 minutes 43.616 seconds. Now, about 18 months after its international outing, buyers in Malaysia will get a change to own one. As you’d expect, it also comes with a stratospheric barrier to entry, so much so that MBM refuses to disclose it completely, merely saying that it’s priced “from RM3 million”. Historically, neither Mercedes-Benz nor AMG has ever made light of bestowing the title of Black Series on a car. Previous examples have been very fast, true, but also a little overwhelming, characterised by brute force overshadowing the finesse found in their other, lower rung variants. It gains the double wishbone setup and adjustable custom coil-over suspension system from the AMG GT R, albeit modified to handle the additional stresses the Black Series was designed to be subjected to. There’s adjustable carbon fibre torsion bars, dynamic engine and transmission mounts, and even most of the underbody is carbon fibre. That’s the same super rigid lightweight material that’s used for its massive vented bonnet and much of the car’s aero package as well, which press down on the car to the tune of some 400kg at 250km/h. Speaking of which, the cornerstone of the GT Black’s ensemble is its engine. Yes, it’s derived from the 4.0-litre M178 bi-turbo V8 petrol that first debuted in the AMG GT over 7 years ago, but here it has been given a thorough going-over, gaining bits lifted straight out of the AMG GT3 racing car such as its unique ‘flat plane’ crank. To match its unique engine note, the engineers have routed the exhaust manifold as well. Thanks to upgraded intercooler, new camshafts, and beefier turbochargers, the GT Black outputs 730hp between 6,700 and 6,900rpm while peak torque of 800Nm is available from 2,000rpm to 6,000rpm. All that is sent to the rear wheels for the extra wide Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tyres to deal with, as before, through a 7-speed AMG Speedshift dual-clutch transmission. A 100km/h sprint is dealt with in 3.2 seconds while top speed is 325km/h. Basically, it’s the closest they’ve come to offering customers a race car based on the AMG GT but keeping just enough out of the equation to keep it street legal. The cabin is probably where the road car and GT3 racer differ the most as a fair bit of creature comfort remains in this hardcore circuit muncher. It's got a Burmester sound system too, how extra is that? The GT Black still has the running gear and infotainment toys from the standard car, albeit draped in plenty of Alcantara and exposed carbon fibre. Single piece bucket seats replace plush leather upholstery and there’s even a roll cage obscuring the rearward view.

Alongside the locally assembled A 35 and GLA 35, Mercedes-Benz Malaysia have also launched the newest, most hardcore AMG GT coupe into the Malaysian market: the Black Series.

If the bright orange and gloss black accents didn’t hint at its performance credentials, or if over-the-top aero bits weren’t convincing enough that this machine sits at the top tier of AMG road machines, know that in 2020 it snatched the title of fastest production car to lap the Nurburgring Nordschleife: 6 minutes 43.616 seconds.

Now, about 18 months after its international outing, buyers in Malaysia will get a change to own one. As you’d expect, it also comes with a stratospheric barrier to entry, so much so that MBM refuses to disclose it completely, merely saying that it’s priced “from RM3 million”.

Historically, neither Mercedes-Benz nor AMG has ever made light of bestowing the title of Black Series on a car. Previous examples have been very fast, true, but also a little overwhelming, characterised by brute force overshadowing the finesse found in their other, lower rung variants.

It gains the double wishbone setup and adjustable custom coil-over suspension system from the AMG GT R, albeit modified to handle the additional stresses the Black Series was designed to be subjected to. There’s adjustable carbon fibre torsion bars, dynamic engine and transmission mounts, and even most of the underbody is carbon fibre.

That’s the same super rigid lightweight material that’s used for its massive vented bonnet and much of the car’s aero package as well, which press down on the car to the tune of some 400kg at 250km/h.

Speaking of which, the cornerstone of the GT Black’s ensemble is its engine. Yes, it’s derived from the 4.0-litre M178 bi-turbo V8 petrol that first debuted in the AMG GT over 7 years ago, but here it has been given a thorough going-over, gaining bits lifted straight out of the AMG GT3 racing car such as its unique ‘flat plane’ crank. To match its unique engine note, the engineers have routed the exhaust manifold as well.

Thanks to upgraded intercooler, new camshafts, and beefier turbochargers, the GT Black outputs 730hp between 6,700 and 6,900rpm while peak torque of 800Nm is available from 2,000rpm to 6,000rpm.

All that is sent to the rear wheels for the extra wide Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tyres to deal with, as before, through a 7-speed AMG Speedshift dual-clutch transmission. A 100km/h sprint is dealt with in 3.2 seconds while top speed is 325km/h.

Basically, it’s the closest they’ve come to offering customers a race car based on the AMG GT but keeping just enough out of the equation to keep it street legal.

The cabin is probably where the road car and GT3 racer differ the most as a fair bit of creature comfort remains in this hardcore circuit muncher. It’s got a Burmester sound system too, how extra is that?

The GT Black still has the running gear and infotainment toys from the standard car, albeit draped in plenty of Alcantara and exposed carbon fibre. Single piece bucket seats replace plush leather upholstery and there’s even a roll cage obscuring the rearward view.

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