September 24, 2022
Over in Aussie-land, or sometimes known as Australia, a Malaysian driver was pulled over for speeding, but that was only the tip of the traffic offence iceberg. You have to be colossally dense to drive a car without a valid license. Not only could it land you in plenty of trouble with the law, but it endangers other road users as who knows why that license has lapsed - or worse - revoked. Australia is also notorious for their super strict - even fanatical - laws and enforcement against speeding. Drivers there routinely get caught, fined, sometimes even jailed if found in violation too many times - up to 3 years in fact - for even exceeding the speed limit by a few kilometres per hour. As we know, things are a little more lax in over here, so one when one Malaysian was pulled over by a New South Wales traffic police officer for going 113km/h in a 100km/h zone in her older model Honda Accord, things did not look good. The driver, a 26-year old female, then proceeded to make things far worse when she was asked to produce her driver’s license. Certain countries such as Australia do recognise the validity of a license issued to Malaysian citizens by the JPJ and do not require an additional international driving permit. However, upon further investigation and a check with Malaysian authorities, JPJ’s record reveals that the driver did not hold any class of driver’s license. It was a fake, and she was basically driving without having gone through any formal instruction or training in Malaysia. That said, she did have a New South Wales learner driver’s license having been residing in the country for about 6 years on a bridging visa. Seems pretty clear cut. The driver was busted and booked with 3 infringement notices issued in her name: Learner not accompanied by licensed driver or instructor or police officer. Learner did not display L places as prescribed. Learner driver exceeded the speed limit by over 10km/h. Interestingly, NSW police did not list the ‘production of a forged international driver’s license with the intent to mislead an officer’ as one of the offences…..at first. Eventually, she was charged and convicted at the Griffith Local Court on April 13th 2022 for “possessing a false document to influence the exercise of public duty.”

Over in Aussie-land, or sometimes known as Australia, a Malaysian driver was pulled over for speeding, but that was only the tip of the traffic offence iceberg.

You have to be colossally dense to drive a car without a valid license. Not only could it land you in plenty of trouble with the law, but it endangers other road users as who knows why that license has lapsed – or worse – revoked.

Australia is also notorious for their super strict – even fanatical – laws and enforcement against speeding. Drivers there routinely get caught, fined, sometimes even jailed if found in violation too many times – up to 3 years in fact – for even exceeding the speed limit by a few kilometres per hour.

As we know, things are a little more lax in over here, so one when one Malaysian was pulled over by a New South Wales traffic police officer for going 113km/h in a 100km/h zone in her older model Honda Accord, things did not look good.

The driver, a 26-year old female, then proceeded to make things far worse when she was asked to produce her driver’s license. Certain countries such as Australia do recognise the validity of a license issued to Malaysian citizens by the JPJ and do not require an additional international driving permit.

However, upon further investigation and a check with Malaysian authorities, JPJ’s record reveals that the driver did not hold any class of driver’s license. It was a fake, and she was basically driving without having gone through any formal instruction or training in Malaysia.

That said, she did have a New South Wales learner driver’s license having been residing in the country for about 6 years on a bridging visa.

Seems pretty clear cut. The driver was busted and booked with 3 infringement notices issued in her name:

Learner not accompanied by licensed driver or instructor or police officer.
Learner did not display L places as prescribed.
Learner driver exceeded the speed limit by over 10km/h.

Interestingly, NSW police did not list the ‘production of a forged international driver’s license with the intent to mislead an officer’ as one of the offences…..at first.

Eventually, she was charged and convicted at the Griffith Local Court on April 13th 2022 for “possessing a false document to influence the exercise of public duty.”

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