September 25, 2022
This is the new GranTurismo, Maserati’s latest super-GT, revealed in these official images ahead of an imminent full debut to showcase every detail of the resurrected coupe that should bring some fight to the Ferrari Roma and Aston Martin DB11. A little more competition could be coming from Germany in the form of the R232 Mercedes-Benz SL and BMW 8 Series coupe but we’re guessing that the customers looking at a Maserati are looking for a more bespoke machine. Up To 630PS But V8 Is Dead - Maserati GranTurismo The storied marque probably has the most brand cachet of any Italian automotive brand, but their cars are few, far between, and muddied with a couple of SUVs in the range. Now back to resembling their previous form with the MC20 supercar, it’s only fitting that this new GranTurismo inherits its Nettuno twin-turbo 3.0-litre V6 engine. That snarling naturally aspirated V8 has been put out to pasture as had long been feared but the smaller six-cylinder is more than up to the task at least in terms of performance, though it could be found a little lacking in sonic satisfaction. Offered in both Modena (pictured) and Trofeo variants, Maserati is saving exact output figures for the full-on premiere but we expect them to be very close to the MC20, meaning at least 530PS (as we’ve seen this engine in the Grecale Trofeo) and up to 630PS in its most ferocious tune. There are noticeable aesthetic differences between this newest car and the one it supplants but on the whole, it does look like Maserati was taking a conservative, almost evolutionary approach here. Its dimensions look essentially unchanged. New Maserati Design, Classic Twist Sure, it bears the automaker’s updated fascia at the nose and a more elegant rear end, but that side profile and overall proportions seem outright identical to its predecessor, all the way down to the almost undersized alloys that look almost tucked into its wheel wells. Just look at that ‘generous’ fender gap. Hellaflush? Definitely not. The biggest story about the GranTurismo is that it will also be offered with a fully electric powertrain, though details remain unconfirmed until that incoming launch event. Optional: GranTurismo EV Its closest point of reference is the confirmed details we have on the electric version of the Maserati Grecale which will pack a 105kWh battery and dual electric motors for up to 800Nm of torque. Should that unaltered combo be transplanted into the GranTurismo, no doubt it’ll be stupid fast off the line. To quell some fears of an un-emotive driving experience, the company is said to be working on a “distinctive sound” to accompany that e-motor’s faint whine. We’ll believe it when we hear it, is probably the general consensus. The electric GranTurismo is scheduled to be on sale in 2023 in what is shaping up to be a big year for the brand as it’s to be joined by electric versions of the Grecale while similar zero emissions variants of the Quattroporte, Levante, and MC20 (no one is spared the de-engine-isation) coming by 2025. Still, it's great to see a new Maserati out and active.

This is the new GranTurismo, Maserati’s latest super-GT, revealed in these official images ahead of an imminent full debut to showcase every detail of the resurrected coupe that should bring some fight to the Ferrari Roma and Aston Martin DB11.

A little more competition could be coming from Germany in the form of the R232 Mercedes-Benz SL and BMW 8 Series coupe but we’re guessing that the customers looking at a Maserati are looking for a more bespoke machine.

Up To 630PS But V8 Is Dead – Maserati GranTurismo

The storied marque probably has the most brand cachet of any Italian automotive brand, but their cars are few, far between, and muddied with a couple of SUVs in the range. Now back to resembling their previous form with the MC20 supercar, it’s only fitting that this new GranTurismo inherits its Nettuno twin-turbo 3.0-litre V6 engine.

That snarling naturally aspirated V8 has been put out to pasture as had long been feared but the smaller six-cylinder is more than up to the task at least in terms of performance, though it could be found a little lacking in sonic satisfaction.

Offered in both Modena (pictured) and Trofeo variants, Maserati is saving exact output figures for the full-on premiere but we expect them to be very close to the MC20, meaning at least 530PS (as we’ve seen this engine in the Grecale Trofeo) and up to 630PS in its most ferocious tune.

There are noticeable aesthetic differences between this newest car and the one it supplants but on the whole, it does look like Maserati was taking a conservative, almost evolutionary approach here. Its dimensions look essentially unchanged.

New Maserati Design, Classic Twist

Sure, it bears the automaker’s updated fascia at the nose and a more elegant rear end, but that side profile and overall proportions seem outright identical to its predecessor, all the way down to the almost undersized alloys that look almost tucked into its wheel wells. Just look at that ‘generous’ fender gap. Hellaflush? Definitely not.

The biggest story about the GranTurismo is that it will also be offered with a fully electric powertrain, though details remain unconfirmed until that incoming launch event.

Optional: GranTurismo EV

Its closest point of reference is the confirmed details we have on the electric version of the Maserati Grecale which will pack a 105kWh battery and dual electric motors for up to 800Nm of torque. Should that unaltered combo be transplanted into the GranTurismo, no doubt it’ll be stupid fast off the line.

To quell some fears of an un-emotive driving experience, the company is said to be working on a “distinctive sound” to accompany that e-motor’s faint whine. We’ll believe it when we hear it, is probably the general consensus.

The electric GranTurismo is scheduled to be on sale in 2023 in what is shaping up to be a big year for the brand as it’s to be joined by electric versions of the Grecale while similar zero emissions variants of the Quattroporte, Levante, and MC20 (no one is spared the de-engine-isation) coming by 2025.

Still, it’s great to see a new Maserati out and active.

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