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Porsche says one-pedal driving is inefficient, there are better ways!

Porsche has tooted their horn and announced that one-pedal driving in electric vehicles is not efficient.

When Nissan first introduced one-pedal driving in 2010, it gave their Leaf electric vehicle a feature which recaptures energy usually lost during braking.

This is achieved through regenerative braking, which helps to recharge the EV’s battery, even if it is only just a little. Since then, many other EV manufacturers, including Tesla and Volvo, have also incorporated one-pedal driving features into their vehicles.

But according to Porsche, this isn’t very efficient, and they said there’s a better way to go further with an electric car. 

What is this better way? Well, according to the Stuttgart-based manufacturer, coasting as much as possible is a much better way to prolong your EV’s driving range. 

According to an article published by insideevs, Porsche says this is “the more natural process of allowing the vehicle to continue to roll unpowered.”

“This is a more efficient way of driving because it keeps the kinetic energy in the vehicle,” said Martin Reichenecker, Senior Manager Chassis Testing at Porsche Engineering, in a recent press release. The German carmaker emphasizes that one-pedal driving recuperates first and only then converts the recovered energy back into propulsion, which “results in twice the losses,” adds Reichenecker.

Porsche is not all bark and no bite because their Taycan and upcoming Macan EV will not feature one-pedal driving. According to Porsche, however, there is still a point to friction braking, but it’s not to recapture energy.

Porsche says that up to 90% of everyday braking can be done using the electric motors alone(friction braking), without activating the hydraulic braking system. The upside of this is that you save wear on the hydraulic brake system, potentially saving you from changing them often.

Porsche has tooted their horn and announced that one-pedal driving in electric vehicles is not efficient.

When Nissan first introduced one-pedal driving in 2010, it gave their Leaf electric vehicle a feature which recaptures energy usually lost during braking.

This is achieved through regenerative braking, which helps to recharge the EV’s battery, even if it is only just a little. Since then, many other EV manufacturers, including Tesla and Volvo, have also incorporated one-pedal driving features into their vehicles.

But according to Porsche, this isn’t very efficient, and they said there’s a better way to go further with an electric car. 

What is this better way? Well, according to the Stuttgart-based manufacturer, coasting as much as possible is a much better way to prolong your EV’s driving range. 

According to an article published by insideevs, Porsche says this is “the more natural process of allowing the vehicle to continue to roll unpowered.”

“This is a more efficient way of driving because it keeps the kinetic energy in the vehicle,” said Martin Reichenecker, Senior Manager Chassis Testing at Porsche Engineering, in a recent press release. The German carmaker emphasizes that one-pedal driving recuperates first and only then converts the recovered energy back into propulsion, which “results in twice the losses,” adds Reichenecker.

Porsche is not all bark and no bite because their Taycan and upcoming Macan EV will not feature one-pedal driving. According to Porsche, however, there is still a point to friction braking, but it’s not to recapture energy.

Porsche says that up to 90% of everyday braking can be done using the electric motors alone(friction braking), without activating the hydraulic braking system. The upside of this is that you save wear on the hydraulic brake system, potentially saving you from changing them often.

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